Archive for the ‘Easter Triduum’ Category

Rush Not Into Easter   Leave a comment

Rush Not Into Easter

Above:  The Original Text

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Rush not into Easter;

let Jesus remain dead

liturgically for

slightly longer.  He said

+++++

that he would rise again–

as he did so long ago.

On him our hopes we pin–

and salvation also.

+++++

Easter will arrive on

schedule quite soon enough.

Until then think upon

his death painful and rough.

+++++

Then, when Easter is here,

rejoice spiritually

and observe and adhere

to the season gladly,

+++++

keeping Easter fifty

days–through Pentecost–

and marking time holy,

grateful for its high cost.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 19, 2014 COMMON ERA

HOLY SATURDAY, YEAR A

Easter Showers of Blessing Postcard   Leave a comment

April 19, 1924

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Postmarked April 19, 1924

His Peace Be Thine This Easter Postcard   Leave a comment

September 1, 1912

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Postmarked September 1, 1912

A Happy Easter Postcard   Leave a comment

April 9, 1911

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Postmarked April 9, 1911

Happy Easter Postcard   Leave a comment

March 25, 1910

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Postmarked March 25, 1910

Easter Greetings Postcard   Leave a comment

March 21, 1910

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Postmarked March 21, 1910

An Easter Message   Leave a comment

00001_00000

Above:  Easter Vigil, St. Martin-in-the-Fields Episcopal Church, Atlanta, Georgia, March 30, 2013

Image Source = Bill Monk, Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta

(https://plus.google.com/photos/114749828757741527421/albums/5861636071859841105/5861631935248085218?banner=pwa&pid=5861631935248085218&oid=114749828757741527421)

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Before the early day-dawn

Pushed back night’s sable pall,

The women, worn with weeping,

Came past the city’s wall.

Bereft and broken-hearted,

From their eyes sleep had fled,

And they could wait no longer

T’anoint their precious dead.

+++++

With fragrant spices laden

They hasten toward the tomb

Forgetting in their eagerness

The guard and seal of Rome,

But one, at last, remembers–

“O, who shall roll away

The stone?” she cries.  The others

Gaze at her in disarray.

+++++

But still they hasten onward,

Search knowing why they do–

Not one, nor all, could move it,

Rome’s seal forbade them, too.

In morning’s first faint glimmer

They reach their journey’s end,

And lo, the tomb is empty!

Oh where, where is their Friend?

+++++

While stunned and terror-stricken

They stand in helpless grief,

A messenger from heaven

Brings to their hearts’ relief.

He said, “Fear not.  Why seek ye

The living ‘mongst the dead?

Your Lord’s not here, but risen,

Even as He hath said

+++++

“Go ye:  tell his disciples

He goeth on before,

And if they will not follow,

They’ll find their Lord once more.”

We, too, may claim the message

To them by angels given–

We’ll find Him if we follow:

Here, first, and then in heaven.

NELLIE SEGUIN FOX BARRETT

An Easter Offering   Leave a comment

00001_00001

Above:  Easter Vigil, St. Martin-in-the-Fields Episcopal Church, Atlanta, Georgia, March 30, 2013

Image Source = Bill Monk, Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta

(https://plus.google.com/photos/114749828757741527421/albums/5861636071859841105/5861631937773272002?banner=pwa&pid=5861631937773272002&oid=114749828757741527421)

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I have no worthy gift to bring

To Thee, my risen Lord,

Though fain I’d give the richest

That the mines of earth afford:

For I am poor.  But had I wealth,

How could I hope to bring

A fitting tribute unto Thee,

The whole creations’ king?

And yet my heart is hungering

To own Thee as its God;

Accept the homage of my life–

Thou knowest I love Thee, Lord.

NELLIE SEGUIN FOX BARRETT

UNION POINT, GEORGIA

EASTER 1914

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Easter Sunday fell on April 12 in 1914, according to The Book of Common Prayer (1892).

http://justus.anglican.org/resources/bcp/1892/Lectionary_1892.htm#Tables_HolyDays

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Posted February 13, 2014 by neatnik2009 in Easter Triduum, Nellie Sequin Fox Barrett--Writings

Tagged with

An Easter Hymn   Leave a comment

00001_00000

Above:  Easter Vigil , St. Martin-in-the-Fields Episcopal Church, Atlanta, Georgia, March 30, 2014

Image Source = Bill Monk, Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta

(https://plus.google.com/photos/114749828757741527421/albums/5861636071859841105/5861631935248085218?banner=pwa&pid=5861631935248085218&oid=114749828757741527421)

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Once more the dawn of Easter floods

The opalescent sky

With glory, as a hope new-born,

Lights a despairing eye.

With grateful tears we lift our hearts

To Him who loved us so,

He spared not e’en His only Son

To save the world from woe.

+++++

But vain indeed the gratitude

That spends itself in tears,

And does not spur to acts of love,

And faith that mocks at fears.

O Master, if our wayward hearts

Have Thee afresh entombed

Beneath a load of worldly cares,

Until our lives seem doomed,

+++++

Break Thou the fettering bands, and roll

From our heart’s door away,

The stone of cold indifference

And rise anew today.

Henceforth in resurrection power,

To rule our lives that we

In utter truthfulness may say,

“Christ lives again in me.”

NELLIE SEGUIN FOX BARRETT

GAINESVILLE, GEORGIA

APRIL 1, 1923 COMMON ERA

Posted February 12, 2014 by neatnik2009 in Easter Triduum, Nellie Sequin Fox Barrett--Writings

Tagged with

John 20, 31   1 comment

John 20

Above:  The Original Text

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

EDITOR’S COMMENT:

The authorship of the Johannine Gospel is a matter of legitimate scholarly discussion and much uncertainty, despite certain traditions, actually.  I am comfortable with that situation.  My great-grandfather was wedded to certain traditions, as I am to my own set of them–frequently different traditions.

By the way, all of us–even those who protest vocally against tradition–affirm our favorite traditions.   Ironically, the lack of certain traditions becomes its own tradition.  I prefer to be intellectually honest about the matter and to avoid hypocrisy regarding this issue.  And I think that my great-grandfather was intellectually honest about his preferences among traditions also.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

FEBRUARY 6, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCUS AURELIUS CLEMENS PRUDENTIUS, POET AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF GEORGE VI, KING OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND

THE FEAST OF SAINT VEDAST (VAAST), ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF ARRAS AND CAMBRAI

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM BOYCE AND JOHN ALCOCK, ANGLICAN COMPOSERS

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Jno. 20, 31

I.

The richest book.   John wrote late in life after much thought, giving us a spiritual gospel, deep insight into our Lord’s life.  Selected his material to this end.

II.

“That ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God.”  Just to affirm it was not enough.  We need to discover it for ourselves.  “Flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto you, but my Father.”  Only belief that he is divine can explain him and his works.  Admit that and all is clear.

III.

“That believing ye might have life through him.”  This the great end to be desired.  “The end of your faith, the salvation of your souls.”  “Being justified by faith we have peace.”  “As many as received him to them gave he power to become the sons of God,” etc.  “The just shall live by faith.”  “That they might have life…abundantly.”  “This life is in his Son.”

IV.

How rich is this life!  Communion with God, the quickening and development of all our nobler powers of soul.

It uplifts the individual, the nations.  “On earth as in heaven.”  “Let this mind be in you.”  “We have the mind of Christ.”  “The end everlasting life.”

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT