Archive for the ‘George Washington Barrett (1873-1956)’ Category

Historic Sanctuary, Gray United Methodist Church, Gray, Georgia   Leave a comment

Above:  The Historic Sanctuary, June 11, 2018

Photographer = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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I was driving through Gray, Georgia, where my great-grandfather, George Washington Barrett (1873-1956) served from late 1917 to late 1919.  He was a minister in the North Georgia Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (1845-1939).  For two years he served a three-point charge that included the congregation in Gray.  He preached in the building pictured above.

The windows postdate his time as pastor, obviously.

Notice the side view of the building.  The back section, with the door facing toward the street, is younger than the rest of the building.  According to the church’s website, the back section dates to the 1940s.

One way of connecting with one’s ancestors is to visit places they lived, worshiped, et cetera.  I try to imagine my grandmother, Nell Barrett (1915-2001), on this site as a young child.  I try to imagine my great-grandfather, not as the silver-haired gentleman I have usually seen in photographs, but as a younger man.  Here I have a tangible connection to my family’s past.  Liturgically and theologically I would not fit in at Gray U.M.C., but that is fine.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 21, 2018 COMMON ERA

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Obituary of George Dickey Barrett   Leave a comment

George Dickey Barrett 01

George Dickey Barrett 02

George Dickey Barrett 03

Obituary courtesy of Sally Taylor Stuckey

Scans by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

GEORGE DICKEY BARRETT

Born January 25, 1910, in Habersham, County, Georgia, where his father, George Washington Barrett (1873-1956), served as pastor of the Cornelia and Demorest Methodist Episcopal Churches, South, from late 1908 to late 1910

Died Friday, February 17, 1989, at Atlanta, Georgia

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George Dickey Barrett was my grandmother Nell Barrett Taylor’s brother.

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The person who clipped the obituary from The Atlanta Constitution did not note the date or page number.

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Gray United Methodist Church, Gray, Georgia, Part II   Leave a comment

Historic Sanctuary and Youth Fellowship Hall May 4, 2015 01

Above:   The Youth Fellowship Hall and the Historic Sanctuary, Gray United Methodist Church, Gray, Georgia

Source for All Images = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Date for All Images = Monday, May 4, 2015

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George Washington Barrett (1873-1956) served the Gray Circuit (then in the North Georgia Conference) of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, from late 1917 to late 1919.  The physical plant of the Gray Church has grown and changed since then.  The first addition was to the back of the now Historic Sanctuary.  The front part of the building dates to 1915.  The back of it dates to the 1940s.  The brick Youth Fellowship Hall has been in existence since the 1960s.

Historic Sanctuary and Youth Fellowship Hall May 4, 2015 02

Youth Fellowship Hall May 4, 2015

The congregation has adapted two houses for parish use (one for the Administrative Offices) and erected new buildings across the street from the Historic Sanctuary and Youth Fellowship Hall.  The relative positions of the new worship space, the Historic Sanctuary, and the Administrative Offices is obvious below, with the Administrative Offices to the right.

Administrative Offices, Historic Sanctuary, and Family Life Worship Center May 4, 2015

Plans for a new space intended just for the public worship of God exist.  The new sanctuary will sit next to the current main worship space, the family life center.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MAY 9, 2015 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THOMAS TOKE LYNCH, ENGLISH CONGREGATIONALIST MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF ANNA LAETITIA WARING, HUMANITARIAN AND HYMN WRITER; AND HER UNCLE, SAMUEL MILLER WARING, HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT GREGORY OF NAZIANZUS, BISHOP OF CONSTANTINOPLE

THE FEAST OF SAINTS WILLIBALD OF EICHSTATT AND LULLUS OF MAINZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT WALBURGA OF HEIDENHELM, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBESS; SAINTS PETRONAX OF MONTE CASSINO, WINNEBALD OF HEIDENHELM, WIGBERT OF FRITZLAR, AND STURMIUS OF FULDA, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOTS; AND SAINT SEBALDUS OF VINCENZA, ROMAN CATHOLIC HERMIT AND MISSIONARY

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Gray United Methodist Church, Gray, Georgia, Part I   1 comment

Historic Sanctuary May 4, 2015 12

Above:   The Historic Sanctuary, Gray United Methodist Church, Gray, Georgia

Source for All Images = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Date for All Images = Monday, May 4, 2015

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Last Monday, May 4, when I was driving from Athens to Americus, I stopped in Gray, just north of Macon.  My great-grandfather, George Washington Barrett (1873-1956) served the Gray Methodist Episcopal Church, South (now the Gray United Methodist Church), from late 1917 to late 1919.  The now “Historic Sanctuary” was about two years old then, for the congregation had rebuilt after a fire had destroyed the previous structure.  The building I photographed did not exist in the current outward form at the time.  The choir loft and the Sunday School rooms in the back did not exist until the 1940s.  I had seen pictures of the old building via Google street view, but walking on the grounds was much better, as I expected it to be.  Street view helped me to know what to look for when I arrived.

Historic Sanctuary May 4, 2015 11

Historic Sanctuary May 4, 2015 09

Historic Sanctuary May 4, 2015 10

I think of other connections to my family’s history.  Firstborn son Randolph Winburn Barrett (1905-?), may God rest his soul, however or whenever he died, would have been an adolescent while there.  Second child Sarah Claiborne Barrett (1908-1954) was a child.  Third child George Dickey Barrett (1910-1989) would have been old enough to have memories of the place.  Fourth child Lucy Seguin Barrett (1912-2001) might have had some memories of her time in Gray.  My grandmother, Nell Fox Barrett (later Taylor) (1915-2001), was too young to have memories of her time there.  The same was true of sixth (and last) child, Margaret Elizabeth Barrett (1917-2007).

Below:  Views of the Side of Building Away from the Street

Historic Sanctuary May 4, 2015 06

Historic Sanctuary May 4, 2015 07

Historic Sanctuary May 4, 2015 08

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Historic Sanctuary May 4, 2015 04

Historic Sanctuary May 4, 2015 03

Historic Sanctuary May 4, 2015 02

Historic Sanctuary May 4, 2015 01

The old building is lovely.  I am glad that it is still in active use for its intended purpose.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MAY 9, 2015 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THOMAS TOKE LYNCH, ENGLISH CONGREGATIONALIST MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF ANNA LAETITIA WARING, HUMANITARIAN AND HYMN WRITER; AND HER UNCLE, SAMUEL MILLER WARING, HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT GREGORY OF NAZIANZUS, BISHOP OF CONSTANTINOPLE

THE FEAST OF SAINTS WILLIBALD OF EICHSTATT AND LULLUS OF MAINZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT WALBURGA OF HEIDENHELM, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBESS; SAINTS PETRONAX OF MONTE CASSINO, WINNEBALD OF HEIDENHELM, WIGBERT OF FRITZLAR, AND STURMIUS OF FULDA, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOTS; AND SAINT SEBALDUS OF VINCENZA, ROMAN CATHOLIC HERMIT AND MISSIONARY

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Descendants of John Barrett and William Winburn (VII)   Leave a comment

CHILDREN, GRANDCHILDREN, AND GREAT-GRANDCHILDREN OF ROBERT WESLEY BARRETT (1860-1924) AND SARAH JANE WINBURN BARRETT (1838-1883), PART II

Descendants 08B

Descendants 08C

Descendants 09A

Scans Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Robert Wesley Barrett (1860-1924) was the first child of William Wesley Barrett (1835-1911) and Sarah Jane Winburn Barrett (1838-1883) and the father of George Washington Barrett (1873-1956), my great-grandfather.  Nell Barrett Taylor (1915-2001) was my grandmother.

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Descendants of John Barrett and William Winburn (VI)   Leave a comment

CHILDREN, GRANDCHILDREN, AND GREAT-GRANDCHILDREN OF ROBERT WESLEY BARRETT (1860-1924) AND SARAH JANE WINBURN BARRETT (1838-1883), PART I

Descendants 07B

Descendants 07C

Descendants 08A

Descendants 08A

Scans Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Robert Wesley Barrett (1860-1924) was the first child of William Wesley Barrett (1835-1911) and Sarah Jane Winburn Barrett (1838-1883) and the father of George Washington Barrett (1873-1956), my great-grandfather.

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Descendants of John Barrett and William Winburn (V)   Leave a comment

Descendants 06E

Descendants 07A

Scans Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

William Wesley Barrett (1835-1911) was the fourth child of Elisha Chastain Barrett (1806-1886) and Nancy Mabry Barrett (1810-1849) and the father of George Washington Barrett (1873-1956), my great-grandfather.

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The End of the Line (As Far As I Know) for George Washington Barrett Sermon Outlines   Leave a comment

George W. Barrett Scan

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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I have, to the best of my knowledge, added all extant and complete sermon outlines by my great-grandfather, George Washington Barrett (1873-1956), to this weblog.  Many others did exist; this I know beyond a shadow of a doubt.  The ravages of time and human carelessness have denied many of these documents to me, one interested in family history.

Barrett, an active Minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, then the reunited Methodist Church from 1899 to 1945, was a man of his time, as I am a man of my time.  A century separated my birth from his.  One hundred years made a great deal of difference.  He was well-acclimated to old-style Southern Methodism with a Pietistic streak.  I, in contrast, seemed born to become an Episcopalian, given my penchant for ritual formality and my spiritual need for frequent Holy Eucharist.  These differences have led me to occasional fits of frustration with my great-grandfather Barrett, especially when I have typed one of his denunciations of “externals” (a frequent topic of consternation among Pietists) or playing cards, and I have not been shy about expressing myself in writing regarding such issues.

I make no excuses for such criticism.  If the fact that I have expressed an opinion different from his offends someone, so be it.  Such a person, offended by the reality of subjective differences, will experience life as a series of tizzies, I suppose.  That is not my responsibility.

I do thank my great-grandfather Barrett for doing his part in maintaining the Christian faith in my family.  This faith became part of my inheritance.  It nurtured me until I claimed it for myself.  The rituals marking that faith journey include baptism (by the hand of my father, John D. Taylor, III, at North Newington Baptist Church, Newington, Georgia, in 1979), confirmation into The Episcopal Church (at St. Anne’s, Tifton, Georgia) by Bishop Harry Shipps in 1991, reaffirmation of faith (at Trinity, Statesboro) in the presence of Bishop Henry Louttit, Jr., in 2003, and reaffirmation again (at the Cathedral of St. Philip, Atlanta, Georgia) in the presence of Bishop J. Neil Alexander in 2008.  Although my spiritual path differs from that of my great-grandfather Barrett, it exists in large part due to him.  So he, warts and all, was a positive (even if indirect) influence on me.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 27, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE SECOND SUNDAY OF EASTER, YEAR A

THE FEAST OF GEORGE WASHINGTON DOANE, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF NEW JERSEY

THE FEAST OF SAINTS ANTONY AND THEODOSIUS OF KIEV, FOUNDERS OF RUSSIAN ORTHODOX MONASTICISM; SAINT BARLAAM OF KIEV, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX ABBOT; AND SAINT STEPHEN OF KIEV, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX ABBOT AND BISHOP

THE FEAST OF THE EARLY ABBOTS OF CLUNY

THE FEAST OF JOSEPH WARRILOW, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST

From One Generation to Another   Leave a comment

self-august-2009Above:  The Author in August 2009

Photograph by Bonny Thomas

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My Quest to Understand Better Ancestral Influences Upon Me

God does not hold members of one generation responsible for sins of members of another, I affirm, but I know that positive and negative attributes of people can–and frequently do–influence others of subsequent generations.  The examined life–the only one worth living–compels me to understand myself better by studying my family history.  This research has yielded many results already, prompting me to wonder what I will learn in the future.

One goal is to arrive at (as nearly as possible) an accurate understanding of who people were.  I seek neither to idealize nor to demonize anyone.  Indeed, each of us is a combination of the good and the bad.  I, keenly aware of much of my dark side as well as many of my positive aspects, strive to find then to maintain a balanced approach toward myself and others.  Ockham’s Razor provides invaluable guidance when evidence becomes thin.  Along the way I proceed in the knowledge that, although reality is objective and frequently knowable, sometimes evidence has not survived or come down to me.  Thus I must approach my conclusions with a healthy amount of humility.

Each of us is also a product of his or her time, culture, and subculture, not just genetic influences.  Nature versus nurture is a false dichotomy.  I recognize these facts yet refuse to fall into the trap of a false relativism which says that I ought not to apply constant moral standards across time.  Each of us has moral blind spots.  Often they are related to what those around us tell us.  That explains a great deal yet excuses nothing.  Fortunately, God forgives much.

I, having covered the procedural material, turn my attention to conclusions.

I can trace some influences–positive and negative–upon me back through my family tree all the way back to some great-grandparents.  To them and to those between them and me chronologically I owe a great debt of gratitude for much, such as the rich inheritance of Christian faith.  My faith, although quite different from that of two grandfathers in particular–George Washington Barrett (1873-1956) and John Dodson Taylor, Sr. (1860-1936)–owes much to theirs.  Yes, some sermon notes of George Washington Barrett annoy me, prompting me to take breaks between postings of them, but I also find much with which to agree.

Now I understand well how certain actions and attitudes of a certain great-grandfather have affected me strongly–for good and for ill.  Sometimes I do not know if certain influences from him are positive or negative, only that they exist.  Yet I do know that improved understanding of self is positive.

I, for my own reasons, decided long ago never to become a father.  Chief among them was the fact that I dislike children.  To say that they annoy me is to understate reality.  I have little patience with those agents of chaos.  To bring even one into the world would be unfair to him or her.  Biological reality holds that one Taylor lineage will end with me.  That is fine, for what is a family name anyway?  Immortality comes via the afterlife, not an unbroken line of progeny.  Besides, I influence others daily.  May I, by grace, pass along mostly positive legacies.  Who knows how long they will endure in successive generations?

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 7, 2014 COMMON ERA

The Sunny Side of Parsonage Life   Leave a comment

barretts

Above:  George Washington Barrett (1873-1956) and Nellie Seguin Fox Barrett (1876-1958) with their Daughter, Nell Barrett Taylor (1915-2001), My Grandmother, Probably in the 1950s

Image Courtesy of Randolph Fleming Taylor

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EDITOR’S COMMENTS:

  1. I have interjected personal names, place names, and dates into my great-grandmother’s undated text occasionally to make clear the chronology and geography.
  2. The original title of this text was “Beautiful Things My Husband’s People Have Done for Me.”
  3. I have written my own reflections, which arrive at a different conclusion:  http://blogatheologica.wordpress.com/2014/02/08/living-in-an-aquarium/.  Such a life is not for everybody.
  4. The Methodists used to move their pastors and pastor’s families in late November or early December, depending on the year.
  5. I have used North Georgia Conference Journals, George Washington Barrett’s Descendants of John Barrett and William Winburn (Decatur, GA:  Banner Press, 1949), family oral tradition, and my storehouse of church historical knowledge as sources of details.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

FEBRUARY 13, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AQUILA, PRISCILLA, AND APOLLOS, COWORKERS OF THE APOSTLE PAUL

THE FEAST OF ABSALOM JONES, EPISCOPAL PRIEST

THE FEAST OF ANDREAS KATSULAS, ACTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT LICINIUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF ANJOU

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Poor child!  She does not know what she is getting into.

Thus spoke the widow of a preacher when my sister told her of my approaching marriage [on January 17, 1900, when my great-grandfather, George Washington Barrett, was pastor of the Alpharetta circuit] to a young itinerant Methodist preacher.   I informed sister that I preferred a hard time with him to luxuries without him.  However, I spent many moments wondering what she meant.  I am still wondering, though I have found that her opinion is very largely accepted.  After reading a recent magazine article, I decided that it is time one should give the other side of the picture; and so I desire to tell of some of the many lovely things my husband’s people have done for us.

First of all, to my way of thinking, is the friendly welcome that has invariably been accorded to us.  Not once have I been made to feel as if I were on probation–that they were waiting to decide whether to accept me as one of the community.  Always we have been met at the train and taken to the parsonage where a welcome committee was assembled and a delightful meal served in such bountiful quantity that culinary labors were reduced to the minimum while we were getting settled.  The parsonage has been prepared for us as well as the brief time between the departure of the our predecessor and our arrival allowed.  And when obtainable, flowers added to the festive array of the home.

A short time after we reached our second charge [Blue Ridge Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Blue Ridge, Georgia, 1902-1904], my husband was requested to meet some friends at the Y.M.C.A. one evening.  A lady friend came up to keep me company while he was there.  Soon he returned with a check for a splendid suit of clothes, the compliment of the railroad men of the town.  They chose to bestow it rather than to see if the new pastor pleased them or no.  It was a timely gift, though they did not know it, for they thought the pastor was a bridegroom.  He had been, almost three years before, and was still wearing his wedding suit for best.

When our first baby [Randolph Winburn Barrett, 1905-?, born when his parents were at Palmetto, Georgia] came, we had many lovely attentions bestowed.  He happened to be the first baby that had ever lived in that parsonage.  When it was time to put him in short clothes, before I could get more than started at making them, behold, the ladies of the charge sent in the most complete outfit one could wish.  That was paralleled when the sixth baby [Margaret Elizabeth Barrett, later Bartlett, 1918-2007, born when her parents were at Gray, Georgia] was on the way.   I was much too sick to sew, though I tried to do so while lying in bed.  The ladies sent me word that they were making the layette for me and I was not to sew at all.  And it was such a beautiful little wardrobe–sheer, fine materials, hand-embroidered, [with] fine lacy tatting on edges and set in as medallions, and an abundance of garments, even a little pillow with hand-embroidered slips, and a number of extra garments for me.  And all this when I had not been worth a thing to the church, for I had been too sick to do any church work, and we had illness in the family too.

This same charge [the Gray Circuit, Gray, Georgia, 1917-1919] being dissatisfied with the reception of their pastor, because they had only one hour from the departure of our predecessor and our arrival, sent me word at Christmas that I was not to prepare a Christmas dinner.  It was sent on Christmas Day, and what a feast it was!

At another place [Gainesville, Georgia, where my great-grandfather served at the St. Paul Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 1922-1925] my husband’s brother [Robert Wesley Barrett (August 18, 1860-January 13, 1924)] had died and was brought there for burial.  [The Barrett family was from Gainesville and Oakwood.]  The family connection being large, we had considerably above a score with us to lunch.  What did those blessed women do but send in lunch for the crowd, and some came and helped serve, and then they washed up and left everything ready for the next meal!

It was here [St. Paul Church, Gainesville, Georgia], too, that various improvements to the parsonage furnishings were added along during our years of service because, they said, they wanted us to have the opportunity to enjoy them while there.  And it was here, having learned someway the date of our twenty-fifth wedding anniversary, [that] some of the members of our church combined with friends in another church in town and presented us with a handsome chest of flatware.

So far as I know there has been no attempt to criticize my own or even my children’s dress, but I’ve often been complimented on the children’s appearance.  And whenever I have had either a new hat or dress, the ladies appeared to take as much pleasure in them as I did.

At another charge [Tignall-Broad River Circuit, Tignall, Georgia, 1919-1922] one of our stewards [Yes, the Methodists used to have church officers called stewards.], a widower, lived across the street from the parsonage.  Beginning with a ten-pound turkey for our Christmas gift, he filled the three years of our stay with loving, brotherly attentions so delicately offered that one could not feel offended.

We were quarantined just at the Christmas holidays because of diptheria in our home and people feared the children might not have their stockings filled; so they proceeded to provide against such an emergency.  And how they did provide!

Another time [at Tignall] the children and I had whooping cough.  Our oldest daughter [Sarah Claiborne Barrett (1908-1954)] was very ill and the youngest [Margaret (1918-2007] of our brood of six was under two years of age.  To secure help was almost impossible, it being peach-packing time.  I was under a great strain, for my husband was away holding meetings on the charge.  Those good friends sent out of the community and brought in a nurse, telling her to stay as long as I needed her.  They paid her salary weekly and I knew it not until she was leaving and I endeavored to pay her for her services.  It was here that, when we were unexpectedly moved [in 1922], the Woman’s Missionary Society sent a committee to ask me please not to clean up the house.  I protested because such was not my custom, always leaving the house ready for our successor.  But Mrs. S. put her arm about me tenderly and said,

Please, you can do it for us because we want to do it for you.

I did it and to this day can never think of it without grateful tears.

I do not believe these were exceptional charges.  I could name some lovely things from every place we have lived and I truly believe all the churches want to really love their pastor’s family; but this is enough to show

the sunny side

of parsonage life.

It has been a happy life to me, though, of course, there are some things I should prefer otherwise–but is there any lot in life without some drawbacks?  But this is my most sincere and loving tribute to the churches my husband has served.  They have treated me as they would wish to be treated if they were in my place.  Could anyone ask more?

NELLIE SEGUIN FOX BARRETT

NO EARLIER THAN 1924