Archive for the ‘George Washington Barrett 1938-1942 M-Z’ Category

“Through the Gates Into the City”   1 comment

Through the Gates Into the City

Above:  The Original Document

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

EDITOR’S COMMENT:

I have no idea who Mrs. Hermans was or what quote of hers my great-grandfather repeated.  But these are minor issues.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 27, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE SECOND SUNDAY OF EASTER, YEAR A

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

“Through the gates into the city.”–Rev. 22, 14

“And he shall go out no more.”–Rev. 3, 12

I.

What a creature is man.  How like a God combining the earthly and the heavenly in his nature, physical and spiritual.  His God-appointed destiny through redemption in Christ is in the heavenlies at God’s right hand.

At death he enters through the gate into the celestial city, with foundations whose builder and maker is God.  Jesus went away to prepare for his own.  He will receive them unto himself.  A glorious abode every way worthy of the mighty Lord who prepared it.  (Quote Mrs. Hermans.)

II.

And they go out no more, but are forever at home with the Lord.

They have no desire to leave their eternal, glorious home.

“In thy presence is fullness of joy; at thy right hand there are pleasures forevermore.”  All suffering, all pain, all sorrow and trials forever [are] left far behind.

They see his face and meet one another again.

“Thanks be unto God who giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.”

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

Mutual Sharing of Life   2 comments

Mutual Sharing of Life

Above:  The Original Document

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Rev. 3, 20b

…if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come to him, and will sup with him, and he with me.

Authorized Version

I.

Jesus seeks admission into every heart and life–makes every possible approach to induce us to invite him in.  Why does anyone refuse him?

II.

“I will sup with him.”  I will enter sympathetically, helpfully into his life, share it with him.  How wonderfully he does this.  His presence and grace enrich the life.  He is indeed the “Great Companion.”  Why live without him?

III.

“And he with me.”  Startling glorious!!  He wishes to share his life with us–to bestow the unsearchable riches of his grace upon us.  We may enter into:

(1)  His love–love for the Father, for all men, for all goodness.  Eph. 3, 14-17.  Wonderful!

(2)  His victory over evil–Rev. 3, 21.  He resisted the tempter and is able to succour us when we are tried.  By his grace we may overcome.  Sin is not to have dominion–bear rule–over us.

(3)  His victory over suffering.  Not that it will not come, for we are mortal, but he will enable us to triumph over it, not be crushed by it.

(4)  His victory over death–“shall never die.”  Because he lives we shall live also.  Thank God for such a Saviour!

Is he yours?  Let him in today.

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

Revelation 22, 2 and Ezekiel 47, 12   2 comments

Revelation 22 and Ezekiel 47

Above:  The Original Document

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I.

Salvation likened to a river whose source is the throne of God.  Small at first, it becomes a mighty stream.  Along its banks grows the tree of life, whose fruit fails not.  Its leaves are a healing balm for all our ills.  This is “a balm in Gilead.”

II.

So there is hope for all who turn to God.  Man fails, but God never [fails].

(1)  Evil desires lead to evil deeds.  They need to be taken away and desire for good things made regnant.  How badly it is needed.  “Let brotherly love continue.”  “Love thy neighbor as thyself” that the Golden Rule may become our delight.

(2)  Ill will works so much hurt.  He came to take it away and replace it with good will.  This would cure the hurt of the nations, drive away war and establish peace.

(3)  He will destroy fear and give confidence, trust, and love to all.  The whole attitude of our lives will become new and Christlike.

God speed the day when salvation shall flow down as a mighty river, causing every good thing to live and beautify the whole life of our race in all the world.

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

Take Fast Hold of Instruction   1 comment

Take Fast Hold of Instruction

Above:  The Original Document

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Proverbs 4, 13

I.

All of us alike begin the life void of knowledge.  All we ever know we learn from others.  None can know it all; there is too much and we also lack time.

II.

Knowledge is power, the working tools of life.  We should equip ourselves for usefulness, learn all we can; we will need it and more.

III.

Hence we should very much appreciate every opportunity to learn.  A good teacher is a great benefactor, a fine friend, a mighty blessing to the eager mind.

“Take fast hold of instruction,” be eager to learn every truth you can and make it your own.  It will make your life fuller, stronger, fuller, richer.

IV.

Let wisdom learn how best to use knowledge.  Walk in wisdom’s ways; avoid the evil, pass not by it, turn from it.  Not to do so will make one miserable, rob life of its joy.

“The path of the just is as the shining light that shineth more and more unto the perfect day.”

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

Posted April 26, 2014 by neatnik2009 in George Washington Barrett 1938-1942 M-Z, Proverbs

Tagged with

“What Is Your Life?”   1 comment

What is Your Life

Above:  The Original Document

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Jas. 4, 14

“He desired to make most of this life.”

I.

Man is related to two worlds–here and hereafter.  Helpful and adverse forces play upon him.  Great responsibilities rest upon him.  Fearful consequences if he fails, glories if he succeeds.

II.

Dedicate your life [to] God.  Be a good man.  Do not dare life without God.  You need his guidance and the strength he alone can give.  Ask him to show you what to do.

(1)  Hence be prayerful; keep in touch with him.

(2)  Be a man of our book.  Let the Bible furnish daily admonitions.  [There is] no other book like it.

(3)  Be sure you are unselfish.  Seek to serve in his name.  He that would be chief shall be the servant of all.

(4)  Concentrate your powers upon the task in hand until it is finished.  “This one thing I do.”

III.

At last his “well done” will mean eternal bliss.  He will say if we do well.

“That will be glory for me.”

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

Posted April 24, 2014 by neatnik2009 in George Washington Barrett 1938-1942 M-Z, James

Tagged with

The Problem of Suffering   1 comment

Problem of Suffering

Above:  The Original Document

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

EDITOR’S COMMENT:

I, having read the Book of Job closely a few times during the last several years, feel qualified to issue a statement about that book and the larger problem of suffering.  The book does not provide an answer to that problem.  On the other hand, it does explain why the character of Job suffered.  God, the text tells us, allowed it.  So God was on the dock, according to the Book of Job.  Such is one of the basic issues with which intellectually honest Monotheists (a camp which includes me) must struggle:  there is no bad deity upon whom to cast blame for for pain and suffering while exonerating the good deity of deities of responsibility for them.

That text, however, provides a useful critique of we mere mortals, who, some more often than others, and often out of misguided yet well-meaning piety, presume to think that we know more than we actually know about God.  Job does it, as do his wife and his alleged friends.  The theodicy of the latter constituted idiocy.  On the other hand, Job is the only one asking serious questions of God.  The others are too busy defending their vain notions of God and divine justice to recognize what they see.  The cognitive dissonance which might result if they were to do that is too unpleasant for them, I suppose.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 24, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE MARTYRS OF ARMENIA

THE FEAST OF JOHANN WALTER, COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF THE SEVEN MARTYRS OF THE MELANESIAN BROTHERHOOD

THE FEAST OF TOYOHIKO KAGAWA, TEACHER AND EVANGELIST

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Job 23, 10

I.

Freedom was the problem God confronted in creating man.  Without it man would have no moral nature–no merit or demerit possible.  Yet he was under law.

II.

This [is] the best kind of world in which to develop character, to cultivate the grace of mind and heart.  Love and goodness enrich the life; temptations and afflictions endured strengthen and sweeten character and increase our faith.  “Whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth.”  His purpose is our development.

III.

Much of the sufferings of men results from his mistakes, oft times done in ignorance, as a child that touched a hot stove.  Oft times we bring our trouble by our willful sins.  Sometimes the innocent suffer for the sins of others, even more than the innocent suffer, for they feel it more keenly.

IV.

God does not forget us nor leave us alone.  He assured Paul:  “My grace is sufficient for thee.”  If we will we may rise above it, triumph over by his grace.

Let none rebel against God nor faint by the way.  Rather let everyone look to him for needed strength.  At last “we shall come forth as gold.”  “We shall receive the crown of life.”

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

Nineveh Spared   2 comments

Nineveh Spared I

Nineveh Spared II

Above:  The Original Documents

Images Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

EDITOR’S COMMENTS:

The Book of Jonah, contrary to what my great-grandfather preached, is ahistorical.  It is a satirical commentary on excesses of post-Exilic Palestinian Judaism, replete with exclusivism and too little concern for the goyim.  Thus the morals the text teaches are true and timeless, even though the story is purely fictitious.

God, in the Book of Jonah, succeeds despite–not because of–the prophet.  That, I think, functions as a commentary on how God continues to succeed despite–not because of–at least much of the time–many of us who profess to follow God yet care insufficiently or not at all about certain people quite different from ourselves.  If salvation is indeed ideally for all people, we ought not to block off certain populations as being beyond hope.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 22, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF GENE BRITTON, EPISCOPAL PRIEST

THE FEAST OF CESAR CHAVEZ, LABOR UNION LEADER

THE FEAST OF CHARLES HAMILTON HOUSTON, ATTORNEY

THE FEAST OF SAINT FIDELIS OF SIGMARINGEN, CAPUCHIN FRIAR AND MARTYR

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Jonah 1, 1-3

I.

Nineveh, the great and wicked city, whose sins became intolerable until its doom was impending.

II.

God cared, loved them despite their sin and sought to save them from doom.

God called Jonah to warn them.  What an honor it was, to even try to save the city!  But he ran from God (as he thought) and from his duty.  “He paid the fare” for passage on a ship to Tarshish (Spain).  Honest with man, but unfaithful to God.  Why not be glad to help men to higher things?

III.

Jonah ran into serious trouble. Neglect of duty is a sin.  “He that knoweth to do good and doth it not, to him it is sin.”  The storm endangered all on the ship.  [Jonah,] cast overboard and swallowed by a great fish, for three days he faced his sin while “the billows and waves passed over him.”  Chapter 2 tells us how deeply he repented.

IV.

[Jonah] cast ashore by the fish.  God revived the call and Jonah went to Nineveh with God’s warning message.  The king and the people repented in sackcloth.  God heard and spared the city.

V.

Will the church today carry God’s word to men in darkness?  Or will it dare neglect men and pay the awful price in future calamities?

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Jonah, a Galilean, prophesied about 800 B.C.

Nineveh, capitol of the Assyrian Empire, one of the most ancient cities of the world, built by Asshur, son of Nimrod, the first monarch, who built Babel and other cities (Gen. 10, 8-12).

Above sixty miles in circumference.  Walls 100 feet high, broad enough for three chariots abreast, 1500 towers 200 feet high.

Inhabitants about 600,000

Repented and spared for 150 or 200 years after Jonah, “their iniquity came to the full” and then the prophecy was literally fulfilled, [the city] destroyed by the combined armies of the Medes under Cyaxares and the Babylonians under Nabopolassur about 625 B.C.

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT