Archive for the ‘Habersham County Georgia’ Category

Obituary of George Dickey Barrett   Leave a comment

George Dickey Barrett 01

George Dickey Barrett 02

George Dickey Barrett 03

Obituary courtesy of Sally Taylor Stuckey

Scans by Kenneth Randolph Taylor


Born January 25, 1910, in Habersham, County, Georgia, where his father, George Washington Barrett (1873-1956), served as pastor of the Cornelia and Demorest Methodist Episcopal Churches, South, from late 1908 to late 1910

Died Friday, February 17, 1989, at Atlanta, Georgia


George Dickey Barrett was my grandmother Nell Barrett Taylor’s brother.


The person who clipped the obituary from The Atlanta Constitution did not note the date or page number.



Descendants of John Barrett and William Winburn (XXV)   Leave a comment


Mattison “Matts” Barrett

Isaac Barrett

Warren Barrett

John R. Barrett, Jr.

George Bright Barrett

Descendants 16B

Descendants 16C

John R. “Jack” Barrett, Sr., was a son of John Barrett (born circa 1776) and his second wife, one Ms. Stanton.

I descend from John Barrett and his first wife, Milly Rebecca Chastain Barrett through their son, Elisha Chastain Barrett (1806-1886).


Descendants of John Barrett and William Winburn (XXI)   Leave a comment


Descendants 15B

Asbury (Berry) Barrett was a son of John Barrett (born circa 1776) via his second wife, one Ms. Stanton.  Asbury’s full siblings were John “Jack” R. Sr., Frank, and William M. Sr.  His half-siblings were Elisha Chastain Barrett (1806-1886), my great-great-grandfather; and James Tarrance Barrett (1803-1867).


Hush-a-Bye My Babies Two   Leave a comment


Above:  An Owl, Between 1900 and 1920

Image Source = Library of Congress


Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-matpc-02384



My great-grandmother wrote this text for her first two children, Randolph Winburn Barrett (1905-?) and Sarah Claiborne Barrett (1908-1954).



Hush-a-bye, my babies two,

Sleep while mother sings to you,

Softly, softly close your eyes,

Till the morning gilds the skies.


In your tree a birdie sings

To the nestlings ‘neath her wings,

Chirping softly bids them sleep

In their drowsy cradle deep.


Asks an owl in grave surprise,

Whose are these wide-open eyes?

Only baby owls should be

‘Wake this time of night, you see.


Ere long fairy folk will come,

Trooping from their woodland home.

Then may friendly mortals soon

Watch them dance beneath moon.


But such sights are not for you,

Not tonight, my babies two;

The Sandman has closed your eyes,

Taking you quite by surprise.


Soon in Dreamland you will be,

There perchance you’ll meet with me;

There I soon shall follow you,

Sweetly sleep, my babies two.




Obituary of George Washington Barrett   Leave a comment

George W. Barrett

Above:  George Washington Barrett

An image taped inside a family history book


From the Journal of the North Georgia Conference of The Methodist Church, 1956, pages 110 and 111



The Reverend George W. Barrett was born September 3, 1873, and left us for his heavenly home June 12, 1956.  He was the son of William Wesley and Sarah Jane Winburn Barrett.  He was graduated from Young Harris College in 1899.

On January 17, 1900, he was happily married to Miss Nellie S. Fox.  He is survived by his wife and following children:  George Dickey, Lucy S., Nellie F. (Mrs. John D. Taylor), and Margaret E.  Another daughter, Sarah C., passed away June 12, 1954.  His home was one of culture and refinement whose spiritual atmosphere reflected the presence of the Master who was the real head of the house.

Brother Barrett joined the North Georgia Conference in 1899.  He was ordained deacon in 1899 by Bishop Hendrix and elder in 1903 by Bishop Key.  His appointments were as follows:  Alpharetta; Blue Ridge; Palmetto; Douglasville; Cornelia; Tate; Acworth; Union Point; Asbury, Augusta; Lithonia; Gray; Tignall; St. Paul, Gainesville; Winder; St. Luke, Augusta; Commerce; Rockmart; Second Avenue, Rome; Underwood, Atlanta, from which he retired in 1945.

He was at the table of the Secretary of the Conference for twenty-eight years–for twenty-one years the Secretary of the Conference, and editor of the Conference Journal.  He was a natural born Secretary.  In correspondence with the Publishing House as Editor of the Journal he was often addressed as “the model Secretary.”  In District Conferences or other church meetings, where a secretary was needed, they usually thought of Brother Barrett, if he were present, and elected him.

George W. Barrett was not only a gentleman but a gentle man.  Smoking flax he would not quench and the bruised reed would not be further damaged in his hands.  The ugly habit of self-assertion and self-seeking was not in his make-up.  He walked in deep humility with his Lord, content to feel that always the Master was at hand.

Brother Barrett was a sound Gospel preacher.  His sermons were not cluttered up with trivialities but dealt with the profound truths of the Holy Word.  He followed in the traditions of the fathers and was little moved by modern trends.  His people loved and trusted him.  They believed that in the midst of pretense and sham here, indeed, was a real man of God.  His life was an orderly one.  He was meticulous in his attention to details.  There was method in all that he did.  He was punctual in his appointments and prompt in his obligations.  He had strong convictions and was never ashamed or afraid to declare them.

For more than eighty-two years Brother George W. Barrett had lived among us, walking in the straight and narrow way, his face always toward the morning.  At last the weary feet could carry him no farther.  The gentle knight laid down his shining sword.  The mantle of his noble calling fell from his shoulders unsoiled.  His nerveless hands could no longer hold the working tools of his loved employ.  So he left us–the earth better for his coming, heaven richer for his going–to be at home with God.




It is, I admit, an overwritten obituary in places, but that is excusable.  If one cannot become flowery in an obituary, where can one do so?

I do recognize one glaring omission:  There is no mention of his firstborn son, Randolph Winburn Barrett (1905-?), who disappeared in the 1930s.  I propose no single reason for this, and I hope that nobody thinks I am.  In fact, I suspect that there are at least two reasons for this and almost everything else in the realm of the human race.  I do know that, for a set of reasons, Randolph became a topic to avoid in the household, so I am not surprised that he is absent here.  Maybe the primary reason was grief.  I have no evidence to suggest otherwise, so I extend the benefit of the doubt.




The Ministerial Career (1899-1945) of George Washington Barrett (1873-1956)   3 comments

George W. Barrett

Above:  George Washington Barrett

An image taped inside a family history book


I have derived most information from Journals of the North Georgia Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, (through 1938) and of The Methodist Church (1939 to 1945 and 1956).  I have also drawn information from George Washington Barrett’s small book, Descendants of John Barrett and William Winburn (Decatur, Georgia:  Banner Press, Emory University, 1949).  And I have added my own knowledge from other sources.




Some Preliminaries:

Most pastoral moves occurred in November.  The North Georgia Conference made the transition to Summer moves after George Washington Barrett retired.

The Methodist Episcopal Church, South (1845-1939) reunited with its parent, the Methodist Episcopal Church (1784-1939), and a sibling, the Methodist Protestant Church (1828-1939) to form The Methodist Church (1939-1968).

The Methodist Church (1939-1968) joined with its relative, the Evangelical United Brethren Church (1946-1968), to create The United Methodist Church.

I recommend Google Street View as a wonderful way to get good images of some of these church buildings.

The Conference my great-grandfather as a troubleshooter frequently, hence many short pastorates.   Often he had only a few days’ notice before a move.



Licensed to preach on November 15


Student, Young Harris College, December 1, 1895-May 22, 1899


Admitted to the North Georgia Conference, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South

Ordained Deacon by Bishop Eugene R. Hendrix, D.D., L.L.D.


Pastor, the Alpharetta Circuit (five churches)

Supply Pastor, starting July-November 1899, filling in for the pastor, who was ill


Married Nellie Seguin Fox on January 17


Pastor, Blue Ridge Church


Ordained Elder by Bishop Joseph Staunton Key


Pastor, Palmetto Circuit (five churches)


Firstborn son, Randolph Winburn Barrett, born


Pastor, Douglasville Circuit (two churches)


Second child, Sarah Claiborne Barrett, born


Pastor, Cornelia-Demorest Circuit (two churches)

A few years ago, when I taught some courses at the Demorest campus of Piedmont College, I noticed a certain building across the street.  The Demorest Womens’ Club house looked like an old church.   That is because it used to be one.  It was the home of the Demorest congregation of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (MECS).  Demorest also had a congregation of the Methodist Episcopal Church (MEC).  The two Demorest congregations merged in 1939, when their denominations did, moving into the stately MEC building.  That building, unfortunately, has gone the way of all flesh.  In the late 1940s, however, the Methodist and Congregationalist churches of Demorest merged, forming the Demorest Methodist Congregationalist Federated Church (currently a United Church of Christ and United Methodist Church affiliate), in the home of the former Congregational Church, just up the hill and behind the old MECS church.  The bell in the yard of the Federated Church is from the former MEC structure.

So, when I look at the clubhouse of the Demorest Womens’ Club, I see a building in which my great-grandfather preached.


Third child, George Dickey Barrett, born


Pastor, Tate-Nelson Circuit, Marietta District (two churches)


An Assistant Statistician of the North Georgia Conference


Pastor, Acworth Circuit (four churches)


Fourth child, Lucy Seguin Barrett, born


Statistician of the North Georgia Conference


Pastor, Union Point Circuit (four churches)


Pastor, Asbury Circuit, Augusta (two churches)


Fifth child, Nell Fox Barrett, my grandmother, born on February 2


Pastor, Lithonia Circuit (three churches)


Pastor, Gray Circuit (three churches)


Sixth child, Margaret Elizabeth Barrett, born


An Assistant Secretary of the North Georgia Conference


Pastor, Tignall/Broad River Circuit (two churches)


Pastor, St. Paul Church, Gainesville, Georgia


Secretary of the North Georgia Conference


Pastor, First Church, Winder


Editor of the Conference Journal


Pastor, St. Luke Church, Augusta


Pastor, Commerce Circuit (two churches)


Pastor, First Church, Rockmart

George Dickey Barrett (George’s son) made new carved oak furniture–an altar rail, a lectern, pulpit chairs, the communion table, and choir panels for the church in 1932.  He donated his time and labor, but the church had to hold fundraisers to finance the purchase of materials.  The church used this furniture until 1954.  Sources =,2069657 and family accounts


Pastor, Second Avenue Church, Rome


Pastor, Underwood Memorial Church, Atlanta


Resided at 866 Euclid Road, NE., Atlanta, in a house his wife, Nellie Sequin Fox Barrett, inherited




Died on June 12