Archive for the ‘Love 1800s’ Category

On Burning Up Letters   Leave a comment

Above:  Dancing Flames

Image Source = Oscar

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:DancingFlames.jpg)

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BLOGGER’S COMMENT:

I conclude that my great-grandfather wrote the following poem while having a very bad day.  By the way, he wrote many poems regarding relationships (many of them unsuccessful) with various women.  Make of that what you will.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

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Lye mostly’s made of ashes

But I make ashes of lies,

As from this infernal bundle

The greedy flames arise.

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It is those letters, woman,

That thou didst write to me,

And once I own I loved them

For then I knew not thee.

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But now I glad consign them

To dust, as dust thou art,

And now I have a picture

Of thy own blackened heart.

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Oh! could I only banish

As easy from my breast

The anguish thou hast caused me,

How happy I, how blest.

JOHN DODSON TAYLOR, SR.

Posted March 20, 2012 by neatnik2009 in John Dodson Taylor Sr.--Poems, Love 1800s

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Lizzie   Leave a comment

Above:  The Blue Lady, by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Let lovers rave ’bout “maidens fair,”

But Lizzie is the fairest,

And talk of “dispositions rare,”

But Lizzie’s is the rarest.

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Those eyes are where the god-boy steals,

To shoot his keenest darts,

She looks and then the victim feels

The pleasing, painful smarts.

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As for a round, plumb, bonny face,

I’m sure there’s none can beat her,

I don’t know how her lips would taste,

But guess that none e’er were sweeter.

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For lovely form and graceful air

E’en Venus can’t excel her,

But why should I  thus rant and rear?

She has another fellow.

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This my life’s unchanging tale,

I oughtn’t have sought to win her,

He ought to never bob for a whale

Who couldn’t catch a minnow.

JOHN DODSON TAYLOR, SR.

Posted March 11, 2012 by neatnik2009 in John Dodson Taylor Sr.--Poems, Love 1800s

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That Day I Spent on Choccolocco   1 comment

Above:  Choccolocco Mountain, Jacksonville, Alabama

Image Source = United States Fish and Wildlife Service

(http://www.fws.gov/southeast/mountainlongleaf/)

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A Useful Website:

http://choccoloccomountain.com/

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As backward oft my mind is carried,

To scenes of pleasure long ago,

The place of all where most I’ve tarried–

That day I spent on Choccolocco.

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My heart was gayer, spirit lighter,

Than was the gentle zephyr’s blow,

And Lizzie’s face was never brighter,

That day I spent on Choccolocco.

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I’ve been in many a place since then;

Seen clearer streams more graceful flow;

But oft I’ve long to live again,

That day I spent on Choccolocco.

JOHN DODSON TAYLOR, SR.

To S—– and To the Same (An Autograph)   Leave a comment

Above:  Portrait of Jeanna Samary, by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

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TO S—–

No amorous gust is sweeping o’er my heart,

Which does these grating rhymes of mine inspire;

My strain is feeble, yet it takes its start

From impulse nobler, and from feeling higher.

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‘Tis from esteem of that true woman’s worth

Which shines in thee with such unclouded ray,

To which nor wealth nor titles can give birth,

Whose brightness naught can ever take away.

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And yet my feeble Muse dare not essay

A task as arduous as the task would be

In prose, or rhyme, or in both, to portray

The charms which make their focus, Miss, in thee.

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The graceful form, the stately mien may wake

An evanescent flash of amorous fire,

Yet mental charms outshine it and but make

Its feeble flame grow languid and expire.

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A smooth and placid temper like to thine,

A mind so wealthy, heart so true to right,

Are charms which, with far brighter lustre, shine

Than that which wealth or fame can ever light.

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 TO THE SAME (AN AUTOGRAPH)

Little page, so fair, so white,

Take the name that here I write;

Let not time’s rude hand erase it,

Let not negligence efface it,

Till perhaps when years have flown,

It from memory’s page is gone,

And thy owner o’er thee bends,

Calling up forgotten friends;

For a passing thought assail her

Of that name–’tis J.D.T.—-.

JOHN DODSON TAYLOR, SR.

Posted February 23, 2012 by neatnik2009 in John Dodson Taylor Sr.--Poems, Love 1800s

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I’m Nobody’s Johnny But Thine   Leave a comment

Above:  The Love Letter (1883), by Auguste Toulmouche

They’re a fountain of pleasure to me–

Thy smiles so sweetly benign–

And I’ll ever love thee, only thee,

Oh! I’m nobody’s Johnny but thine.

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And in rapture I ever could gaze

On thy features so nearly divine,

And they weakness e’en beauty displays

Oh! I’m nobody’s Johnny but thine.

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E’en if joy could have been in my cup

And had riches and honors been mine,

For thy sake I’d surrender them up,

Oh! I’m nobody’s Johnny but thine.

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Let the world go crazed about gain,

Seeking fame at ambition’s low shrine,

In thy love I’ll contented remain,

Oh! I’m nobody’s Johnny but thine.

JOHN DODSON TAYLOR, SR.

Posted February 14, 2012 by neatnik2009 in John Dodson Taylor Sr.--Poems, Love 1800s

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To A Little Flower   Leave a comment

Above:  Scene from a Flower Market

Image Source = Bill Whitaker

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Eastern_Market_Detroit_flower.JPG)

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Oh! how dost thou cling so firm to my heart?

What hand give thee such magical power?

By all other beings, but Johnny, thou art

Esteemed as a worthless, mean, faded flower.

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It is because in youth’s beauty and strength

Thou wert clothed in a mantle so lovely and fair,

And when thy sweet lips opened at length,

Thy breath rose in sweet perfumes on the air?

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No, thou wert dead when first I beheld thee,

I do not esteem thy beauties by nature–

‘Tis cause the being whose little hand pulled thee,

Implanted her image on thine every feature.

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Yes, dear, to my heart is thy frail little form,

Tho’ now it is crushed by the tooth of decay,

Thou hast kindled in me a friendship so warm

The cold damps of time cannot take it away.

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Thy frail little hand hast indelibly written

A name deep, and clear, on memory’s scroll;

And tho’ all else on earth be forgotten,

That name to this heart shall never grow old.

JOHN DODSON TAYLOR, SR.

Posted January 24, 2012 by neatnik2009 in John Dodson Taylor Sr.--Poems, Love 1800s

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Poems Regarding Marriage   Leave a comment

Above:  Wedding Rings

Image Source = Jeff Belmonte

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Wedding_rings.jpg)

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ALL SHOULD MARRY (A SYLLOGISM)

In all concerns and cares of life,

Men should always take care;

“He takes a care who takes a wife,”–FRANKLIN.

Therefore, we all should pair.

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A FRAGMENT

If life indeed is what it seems,

‘Tis more than one can carry;

So I think all should double teams,

Or, speaking plainer, marry.

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RINGS

Had rings perception, and the power,

Their ken with words to mate,

Full many a sweet-heart should grow sour

At tales they could relate.

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MARRYING FOR MONEY

A poor woman can

Even wed a rich man,

And yet live happy and well;

But woe’s the poor human

Who weds a rich woman,

For the wedding is the door to his hell.

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JOHN DODSON TAYLOR, SR.

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NOTE:

Unlike my great-grandfather, I am a confirmed bachelor.  So there is a certain irony inherent the fact that I am posting some of these poems.  C’est la vie.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 19, 2012 COMMON ERA

Posted January 19, 2012 by neatnik2009 in John Dodson Taylor Sr.--Poems, Love 1800s

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True Love   Leave a comment

Above:  Flower Bouquet

True Love is the fairest, and sweetest of flowers

That adorn life’s pathway through this earthly sphere;

And if it e’er bloom in these cold hearts of ours,

It is God’s own hand that planteth it there.

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Its fassion seems frail, but its root pierces deep,

And winds its strong arm ‘neath the depth of our hearts;

Tho’ cold stormy blasts oft make it to weep,

A ray from its sun new vigor imparts.

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Misfortune, and sorrow, in torrents may rain;

Adversity’s frosts with destruction may fall;

And poverty’s blasts will blow but in vain,

For its weakness is greatness compared to them all.

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But for Love, like the lover, there’s often an end;

Tho’ while it survives it can never grow old,

Yet when it is blighted it lives not again,

Except as a ghost it haunteth the soul.

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And oft on the mind recollection will steal;

Those scenes once so dear will rise to the sight.

And in the far distance sad anthems will peal,

And the notes of a seraph that has taken its flight.

JOHN DODSON TAYLOR, SR.

Posted January 3, 2012 by neatnik2009 in John Dodson Taylor Sr.--Poems, Love 1800s

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Oh! Those Raven Curls   Leave a comment

Above:  Painting of the Wife of Duncan Campbell

Image Source = Mr. Smee

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mrs_Duncan_Campbell_of_Inverneill_by_Mr_Smee_B_1782.JPG)

Oh! those raven curls–so curly,

Oh! those teeth of pearls–so pearly,

Oh! those eyes of jet–so jetty,

Oh! that form so neat and pretty,

Sure that heart is stone, most stony,

That withstands a bone (“rib”), so bonny.

JOHN DODSON TAYLOR, SR.

Posted December 6, 2011 by neatnik2009 in John Dodson Taylor Sr.--Poems, Love 1800s

Sweet Affie   Leave a comment

Above:  Portrait of Jeanna Samary, by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

That cursed set–the first, coquet–

May capture hearts by hellish arts

And lies that they call “taffy;”

But all I crave is but to have

One heart–that of Sweet Affie.

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Old stags may rear, and rant, and swear

They won’t be found by women bound;

Call me such names as “calf-e”

But he’s a fool, who’d shirk the rule

Of one like my Sweet Affie.

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Th’ ambitious may pursue their way

To lofty fame and living name–

Their highest aim de la vie

But be my mead, O! heaven, I plead,

The heart of my Sweet Affie.

JOHN DODSON TAYLOR, SR.

Posted November 30, 2011 by neatnik2009 in John Dodson Taylor Sr.--Poems, Love 1800s