Archive for the ‘Bible’ Tag

The Home and the Bible   1 comment

The Home and the Bible

Above:  Part of the Original Text

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Deut. 6, 6-7

I.  The home [is] instituted of God.  “It is not good for man to be alone.”  He formed Eve and placed the first pair in a lovely garden, an ideal abode.  The race has discovered no better arrangement–one man and one woman united in love, making a home for themselves.

II.  Its power for good or for ills:

(a)  A home where sin reigns [is] a great course to those in it and [to] others also.

(b)  A wisely religious home is one of earth’s greatest blessings.  Its influence reaches far.

III.  Evidently God meant for the home to be religious–the best home piety, love and wisdom can make it.  Hence the text and kindred passages.  Teach the children God’s great truths and His remarkable dealings with His children.

What a power for good the Bible in the home may become.

Its charming stories, faithful warnings, precious promises, appeals to the highest and best in us, stir up up the soul in noble endeavor.

IV.  Why should not all parents seize these great aids for themselves and their homes, and make the most of them?

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

Posted September 28, 2013 by neatnik2009 in George Washington Barrett 1914-1956

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What Shall I Do With the Bible?   4 comments

Bible Translations

Above:  Five of My Favorite Bible Translations

Photograph Taken Via My Computer Camera, September 13. 2013

From Left to Right:

J. B. Phillips, The New Testament in Modern English (Revised Edition, 1972)

The New Revised Standard Version—Catholic Edition (1993)

The Revised English Bible with the Apocrypha (1989)

The New Jerusalem Bible (1985); and

TANAKH:  The Holy Scriptures (1985).

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EDITOR’S COMMENT:

To say to that my piety differs from that of my great-grandfather is to understate reality.  Although I respect the Bible and therefore take it seriously, my attitudes and many of my conclusions are quite different from his.  Some of these differences fall into the category of the merely subjective–with no right or wrong, just preferences one way or another–and others come under the heading of that which I will not defend, for they are legalistic, even if they are consistent with his cultural milieu and therefore historically understandable.  So know, O reader, that I am myself and my great-grandfather was himself.  And know which is which.  Then you will understand reality correctly.

And I, as a Neo-orthodox Christian, know the difference between the word of God (the Bible) and the Word of God (Jesus).  The former leads me to the latter, where I place my emphasis.  Yet often (as is the case here) I notice Evangelicals and others using “Word” to mean the Bible, not Jesus.  (I have numerous conversational examples to cite, so may nobody question the veracity of my statement.)  Language matters in communication.  If we use the same term to mean different things, a lack of communication results.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 13, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ALL EXILED SAINTS

THE FEAST OF GODFREY THRING, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF JANE CREWDSON, ENGLISH QUAKER POET AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOHN CHRYSOSTOM, BISHOP OF CONSTANTINOPLE

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Psalm 119:105-112

Our text says, “Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a lamp unto my path.”

Read Definition of the Bible

What shall we do with the Bible?

1.  We can refuse to own one.  

The Bible once occupied a prominent place in homes.

2.  We can let it lie on shelves and collect dust or we can use it to hide money, papers, etc.  

Moody said, “Sin will keep you away form the Bible and the Bible will keep you away from sin.”

3.  We can keep it in our pockets.

[Item #4 is erased.–Editor]

5.  We can admit it to be God’s word.  

Dare you to read the Bible if you don’t want to be a Christian?

It is the world’s bestseller.

Men have tried to destroy it.

The American Bible Society distributes it.

If there is something worrying you, read the book.

One doctor’s prescription to a wealthy woman was to read the Bible one hour each day and then come back to see him.

6.  We can commit it.  

Memorize its precious truths–one verse per day.

Jesus used word vs. Devil in His temptations.

7.  We can submit to its teachings:  Do what it says do.

There is no use to read or commit it unless we intend to obey it.

Recite some important commands–

Swearing–“Do not take the name….”

Sabbath Day–Hebrews 10:25

Biggest crowds at Sunday events–Baseball, Theatres, etc.

8.  We can transmit it.

We can tell it to others.

If you love the Word, there is opportunity to teach it.  One advantage of many churches is that that they give so many work to do.

The responsibility of Sunday School teachers is great.

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

SOMETIME AFTER DECEMBER 1952

The Word Laid Up in the Heart   2 comments

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Above:  Reading the Bible

A Currier & Ives Lithograph from Circa 1848

Image Source = Library of Congress

(http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2001703963/)

Reproduction Number = LC-USZC2-2949

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Ps. 119, 11 & Col. 3, 16

1.  The Bible is an inspired book revealing the truths of God we need to know.  Is of more consequence than man’s words.  As certainly His will as if we should hear Him audibly speak.

2.  It gives needed, explicit warning to all touching the fact of sin and its consequences.  Every evil known is dealt with either specifically or in clear and comprehensive generalities.

3.  It prescribes full, sufficient remedies for every sin, both as to past transgression and how to avoid it in the future.  It is the law of life to us, not mere advice.  It is the light for our path, our chart and compass.

4.  It has exceeding, great and precious promises for all who will heed its admonitions.  Thousands have gone home to glory rejoicing in their fulfillment.

5.  But it is not enough to own a copy of the scriptures.  We must “lay it up in our hearts” that we sin not.  There the Spirit will mightily help us thereby.  “If ye love me ye will lay my commandments to heart,”–keep them.  Pity we neglect it so.  We ought to lay it up in our hearts, meditate therein daily, to become mighty in the Scriptures, and our own lives be filled with its music!

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

The Good Fight of Faith   2 comments

Espadon-Morges

Above:  A Longsword

Image Source = Rama

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Espadon-Morges.jpg)

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EDITOR’S NOTE:

I know that my great-grandfather would have disapproved of the milkshake with alcohol I sampled recently.  I passed on it after several sips because of the taste, not any moral objection.  I have consumed alcohol without ever becoming intoxicated.  Most of what I have sampled simply tastes too bad for me to want more.  So I prefer simple tea instead.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MAY 29, 2013 COMMON ERA

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Eph. 6, 10-20 and 1 Tim. 6, 12

This is Paul’s favorite figure.  The Christian life is a warfare–not against flesh and blood but against “spiritual hosts of wickedness”–Eph. 6, 12.  To win this fight one must be in desperate earnestness.

1.  Fight a defensive warfare.  Sin assails us personally; we must repel its assaults.  To yield is death.  There is no hope for one who fails here.

2.  Fight an aggressive warfare.

(a)  Take the strongholds of sin for our captain.  Public evils that harm souls must be drive from our land.  e.g, the saloons and lawlessness

(b)  Sin in the hearts of others must arouse our hearts.  We must do all we can to bring them to Jesus that he may cast out Satan.  Somebody ought to care that others are unsaved.

3.  We must have spiritual weapons.

(a)  Take the sword of the Spirit, God’s word.  Without it we have no weapon with which to fight.

(b)  Prayer is indispensable.  In so doing we receive strength for the conflict.  The great battles are won through prayer.

4.  The soldier has a sure reward, even eternal life:  worth the greatest cost.  Be intelligent, brave & loyal soldiers.

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

The Sufficiency of the Bible   9 comments

Family-bible

Above:  A Family Bible

Image Source = David Ball

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Family-bible.jpg)

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EDITOR’S NOTE:

I, as an Episcopalian, follow not Sola Scriptura, but the Three-Legged Stool:  Scripture, Tradition, and Reason, with Scripture being the most important of the three factors.  My great-grandfather spent most of his life in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (1845-1939), and the end of it in the merged Methodist Church (1939-1968), a predecessor of the current United Methodist Church (1968-).  Methodism has traditionally embraced four standards–the Three-Legged Stool plus experience, with Scripture carrying primacy.  Thus my great-grandfather’s final comment in this sermon outline surprised me.

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

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2 Tim. 3, 16-17

1.  The one great object of the Scriptures is such a revelation of God & His will as that man may be saved from sin and get home to heaven. Evidently the Bible is no textbook on every phase of knowledge, as this is manifestly impossible.  They testify of Christ.  Jno. 5, 39; 15, 26; Luke 24, 25-27.

2.  The Bible is an inspired book:  such it claims to be.  Gal. 2, 2; Eph. 3, 3; 2 Cor. 12, 1 & 7, 2 Peter 1, 21.  We realize this because it inspires us.  Reading it in faith we feel the Spirit’s inspiration.  Great blessings attend its distribution.  It is not to be compared to any other book.

3.  Explicit instruction is given concerning all things needful to man’s salvation.  Man learns of God–His character and will and of His love and mercy.

[Man] also learns of his own sinfulness and its consequences.  Of salvation therefrom and how to obtain it; and of heaven, to which he may come at last.

He may have the Spirit to help understand it.  (Eph. 1, 17-18)  Man needs not more truth revealed but a deeper understanding of the truth already revealed.

4.  Thereby “the man of God is complete” in himself, his own character, and “completely furnished unto every good work.”  It is the only rule and the sufficient rule both for our faith and practice.  Revelation 22, 18-19

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT