Archive for the ‘Liturgy’ Tag

Liturgy Library   1 comment

Liturgy Books I January 18, 2014

Above:  Some of My Liturgy-Related Books, January 18, 2014

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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Liturgy library, expanding,

taking over more of my book

space (not that I object at all),

of you happily, openly, I sing.

Little space once, it is true, you took,

and now you occupy a whole wall.

Liturgy Books II January 18, 2014

One day, I think, my library you

will dominate; positive that

will be, for my appreciation of good

liturgy has increased; once a few

such books sufficed; a handful of them sat

on a shelf; now for my soul they food

Liturgy Books III January 18, 2014

are; I study old hymn texts eagerly;

I explore daily prayer rituals,

finding treasures; these deeds are hobbies.

I wonder what joys still wait for me

as I engage in habitual

and spiritual acts–liturgies.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 19, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE SECOND SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY, YEAR A

THE FEAST OF SARGENT SHRIVER, U.S. STATESMAN

THE FEAST OF SAINT CAESARIUS OF ARLES, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP, AND SAINT CAESARIA OF ARLES, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBESS

THE FEAST OF SAINT HENRY OF UPPSALA, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF SAINT WULFSTAN OF WORCESTER, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

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Ode to Liturgy   3 comments

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Above:  A Portion of the Liturgy Section of My Library, July 2, 2013

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Worship the LORD in the beauty of holiness;

let the whole earth tremble before him.

–Psalm 96:9, The Book of Common Prayer (1979)

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Come, let us bow and kneel,

even light a candle,

in a place of reverence;

may we draw near to God.

Yet about rituals some feel

badly; the forms they cannot handle;

at Prayer Books they take offense;

to such “externals” they refuse even to nod.

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They mistake simplicity for purity,

plainness for earnestness,

mustiness for piety,

and chaos for freedom.

But in order there is liberty,

in beauty there is holiness,

in smells and bells there is propriety,

and in liturgy there is decorum.

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So from mystery and beauty

may we not run;

majesty may we embrace,

not reject;

from awe may we not flee,

but seek as flowers turn toward the sun;

proper ceremony may we adopt when it we detect.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 2, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF WALTER RAUSCHENBUSCH, WASHINGTON GLADDEN, AND JACOB RIIS, ADVOCATES OF THE SOCIAL GOSPEL

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http://blogatheologica.wordpress.com/2013/07/02/ode-to-liturgy/

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Spiritual Religion and Ritualism   8 comments

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Above:  Cathedral of St. Philip, Atlanta, Georgia, April 28, 2013

Image Source = Bill Monk, Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta

(https://plus.google.com/photos/114749828757741527421/albums/5872391793912748097/5872401616857022178?banner=pwa&pid=5872401616857022178&oid=114749828757741527421)

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EDITOR’S NOTE:

My great-grandfather was an old-style Methodist.  I, on the other hand, am an unapologetic and ritualistic Episcopalian.  I have found that

emphasizing…the manner of religious ceremony

creates a holy environment inside which

genuine religious experience

finds a natural home.  In fact, all who adopt a particular pattern of regular worship–liturgy–emphasize the manner of religious ceremony.  My great-grandfather adopted a particular pattern of regular worship–one simpler than mine–but he did adopt a liturgy.  So, even if he did not recognize the fact that he was doing so, he was, so he was guilty of transgressing his own statement at the end of this post.

I have had some negative encounters with people–very conservative Southern Baptists, mainly–who mistake the simplicity of worship for the purity thereof.  But I agree with a Presbyterian college professor who wrote an article about worship in Presbyterian Survey magazine in the 1920s.  Mustiness, he wrote, is not the odor of sanctity.  (If I could find the precise citation on that!)

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MAY 30, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT EUSEBIUS OF CAESAREA, HISTORIAN AND ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF APOLO KIVEBULAYA, ANGLICAN EVANGELIST

THE FEAST OF JOACHIM NEANDER, GERMAN REFORMED MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF JOSEPHINE BUTLER, WORKER AMONG WOMEN

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Rom. 14, 17

1.  Difficult to appreciate small duties and still give proper emphasis to supreme questions.  Ritualism has attracted far too much attention.

2.  Christ’s kingdom is not eating and drinking–externals.  Man’s trouble first of all is an evil heart.  Jesus emphasized the need of the heart above conduct.  (Matt. 15, 8)  By birth & ritualism the Pharisees were the very best.  But He said:  “Ye are of the your father the devil.”  They made a fetish of externals.  Ritualism cannot change the heart; only the blood can.

3.  His kingdom is spiritual–within.

(a)  Righteousness–conformity to heart & life to the law of God–the heart rightly disposes toward God and man.

(b)  Peace with God & man and joy–a positive experience of heart-felt religion.

4.  How are these things realized, by eating and drinking?  Paul says:  In the Holy Spirit.”  The only divine agent used in the salvation of the lost.

5.  Hence appears the folly of emphasizing as some do the manner of religious ceremony, even baptism, and virtually saying only those are Christians who observe certain customs.  See 1 Cor. 13, 1-3 & 1 Jno. 3, 18.

The greatest thing is to have a genuine religious experience.  Walk by this rule.

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT