Archive for the ‘Martin Luther’ Tag

The Place of the College Today   1 comment

Place of the College Today

Above:  The Original Document

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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Ps. 119, 130

I.

Educo, to lead out; hence to develop and furnish for larger service.  One learns where things are, where to seek for further equipment.

II.

This is a day of specialists, who devote themselves to special preparation–do research work.  Knowledge, when properly applied, is power.

III.

The church pioneered in education–believes that an intelligent piety is essential to the greatest usefulness, in pulpit and pew.  Some things can be done only by persons well furnished in head and heart–as Paul, Luther, Wesley.

IV.

Church schools have made a great contribution to Christian sentiment.

They have had to depend largely on small gifts:  of late a few large gifts have been received.

Most men who [have] had the call to preach are poor and need help to prepare for their life-work.  Hence the appeals from our schools for help to carry on.

They call for help now.

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

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Christian Citizenship   1 comment

Christian Citizenship

Above:  The Original Text

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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EDITOR’S NOTE:

I think I know what Henry David Thoreau, Mohandas Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr., would have said about this.  I do, however, detect a strong influence of Martin Luther.

Were those who helped slaves escape to freedom after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 rebels and disturbers of the peace?  If they were, they were correct!

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

FEBRUARY 4, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CORNELIUS THE CENTURION, WITNESS TO THE CRUCIFIXION

THE FEAST OF SAINT GILBERT OF SEMPRINGHAM, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF SAINT JANE (JOAN) OF VALOIS, COFOUNDER OF THE SISTERS OF THE ANNUNCIATION

THE FEAST OF SAMUEL CROSSMAN, ANGLICAN DEAN OF BRISTOL CATHEDRAL

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Rom. 13, 1 & 5

I.

Man has a genius for government.  He must live with others, who share with him life’s common experiences.  He does not, cannot live apart and to himself alone.

II.

For the common good men organize some form of government, enact laws or rules of conduct for all and choose men to administer the government.  These leaders are to labor for the good of all.

The savage seeks to rule or have his own way, by brute force.  Hence there is no stability nor lasting peace possible to him.  Civilization is found where law reigns–the only guarantee to public tranquility.  One should think seriously of how great a blessing it is.

III.

Christianity likewise is concerned for the happiness and usefulness of all.  Her very spirit is general good will.  So it enjoins upon all brotherly kindness and to the effort to live peaceably with all men.  Hence as citizens it is the common duty of men:

(1)  To obey faithfully and conscientiously the law of the land.  Who does not is a disturber of the peace, a rebel.  This involves proper respect of faithful officers.

(2)  Tribute is necessary, to administer the affairs of state.

(3)  The franchise is a solemn responsibility.

“Live in all good conscience.”  God is concerned in these things.

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

Ephesians 2, 10   1 comment

Ephesians 2

Above:  A Portion of the Original Text

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Eph. 2, 10

I.  

Design is manifest in man’s whole being, the evidence of intelligence in all his make up.

II.

Christians are his new creation in Christ Jesus.  Only God can regenerate the heart.  But he does it.  “A new creature,” new creation.

III.

He has great designs in it all–“good works.”  [He] saves us not surely for our selves but for the good we may do.  “That ye might bring forth fruit.”  He cursed the barren fig tree.  The fruitless branch is cut off.

IV.

We are to work by ourselves but with him–to do those things he wills.

He is all the time working to great ends.  He is the senior member of the firm.  How could Paul, Luther, [and] Wesley have done their work without him?

V.

What may we think God is trying to do now in the world?  To reach the unsaved.  To instruct men in the way of life, to rid the world of war.  To relieve the sufferers.

Shall we not labor with him at such tasks?

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

Conservative and Liberal Christianity   1 comment

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EDITOR’S NOTE:

Last January I attended a lesbian wedding; the ceremony was at a church building.  It was a lovely rite and the couple is wonderful.  My great-grandfather would have kvetched endlessly.  He would also object to the fact that the officiating priest was female.  He would probably have called all of us deluded apostates.

My great-grandfather used the word “professor” to mean “one who professes,” not one who teaches at a college or university.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 8, 2013 COMMON ERA

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Matt. 5, 13-16

I.

1.  History demonstrates the downward tendency of character, e.g., the antediluvians, the Israelites under Moses, and their kings.  All earthly movements and civilizations manifest this weakness.

2.  In such a world the church is the one great conservative, restraining power.  It brings a gospel antagonizing all sin and quickening the conscience, offering grace to all.  Christianity has been this force.

3.  If only salt would keep its saltness.  This calls for the most diligent, personal effort.  But delusions and apostasies have come, e.g., the times of Luther & Wesley.  Losing its savour it is useless, harmful.

Yet its restraining power is prevented sometimes by professors & parents who come between it and their children, etc.

II.

1.  But the church must also quicken the dead & almost dead by giving the gospel light to all–aggressive Christianity.

2.  To do this no one should obscure or hide his light by a bushel–timidity, fear, wrong deeds.

It shines best in good works, not mere words.

3.  The desired end of it all is that men may be induced to glorify God.  This should regulate all the life and be uppermost in one’s desire.

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT

The Good Soldier and His Reward   4 comments

Käina_Martin's_Church_ruins_02

Above:  A Celtic Cross in Church Ruins, Estonia

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EDITOR’S NOTE:

St. Paul the Apostle certainly did not write 2 Timothy.

And my great-grandfather had a higher opinion of Martin Luther than I do.  Of course, I have a higher (although mixed) opinion of Roman Catholicism than my great-grandfather did–his was subterranean.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MAY 29, 2013 COMMON ERA

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2 Tim. 4, 7-10

1.  Paul had his own battles to fight and obstacles to overcome.  They had to be fought by himself.

(1)  Internal struggles.  Breaking away from his life-long training.

(2)  Preaching the new gospel of salvation by faith and of resurrection, and defending it dogmatically and in “perils” constantly (2 Cor. 11, 22-33) besides the cares of all the churches.   He was put on his metal–soldier spirit was in great demand.

Such is our case.  We, too, have our battles to fight as good soldiers–as did Athanasius, [Martin] Luther, [John] Wesley, etc.

2.  We have help if we will first receive it.  “Looking unto Jesus” (Heb. 12, 2).  “There I take my stand; I can do no otherwise.  God help me.  Amen.”–Luther.  “God is…our strength.” (Psalm 46, 1)

3.  It is not in vain.  There is a present reward.  No labor of love is lost.  “Tis better to have loved and lost than not to have loved at all.”

There is an eternal reward.  “I have fought the good fight…there is…a crown of righteousness laid up for me.”  This reward is all any heart could wish!

4.  Will we “fight the good fight of faith”?  Will we be true?  Cross-bearers shall become crown wearers.

GEORGE WASHINGTON BARRETT